Thanks. If you mean if you can link up your domain names with the website builders, then yes, that can be done. Each web builder will have their own specific instructions on how to do this. But the basic idea is to log into your GoDaddy account under Domain Management, then change the DNS (domain name server, which is an IP address) and point it to the specific website builder that you are using.
Have just started to use their e-commerce features and agree they are awesome. By comparison I have just built an e-commerce site using BigCommerce and it has been a chore using their site builder. Also have a Shopify site on standby, but I think Weebly will end up being my site of choice, mainly because the guys listen and make every effort to accommodate the users.
While every website builder is a little different in features and price, there is a common pricing structure among most of them. You can expect to pay less than $30 per month to build a website for your small business by choosing a template or theme, adding your own photos, logo, and information, and a website builder will take care of hosting your site for you. That means you don’t have to shop anywhere else to get everything you need to have an online presence.

It’s important to know what you want your website to do. Is it going to serve as informational only with contact information for your brick-and-mortar business? If so, you might want to consider reading through landing page reviews. If you plan to include a blog and photo slideshows to offer your customers free content, then you’ll want a website builder with a multitude of plug-ins for you to add. An ecommerce website can help you pull in revenue from an added avenue and, in that case, you’ll want to choose a website builder that’s meant for ecommerce businesses.

For an independent developer, failure can often feel like a curse, but success can also be a curse in disguise. I’m currently in the position of spinning down a tool lots of people use because I made this mistake. It’s pretty intuitive that we should always start a project by asking ourselves “Why might this fail?”, but we also have to ask a much less intuitive question, “What will I have to do next if this succeeds?”

What do you mean by "fluid and professional"? Are you saying the purpose of the site is to impress people with how fluid and professional it is? So it loads into a browser or on mobile smoothly and quickly? Those "qualities" should be a given for any business-oriented site. You need a site design with content and functionality that is going to achieve your business goals. Also, whatever you come up will be imperfect out of the gate. It's impossible to have a perfect website, ever, but...
Hi there and thank you wor this fantastic WP resource. So much useful information. I have a question, though, I am not finding an answer anywhere but I’m sure you’d be able to point me in the right direction. I have a webpage that I had built with weebly time ago but I finally have time and wish to turn it into a more professional site and blog. I want to move to WP.
While this course is short, every module is important, and each module builds upon the last. Stick with it, and by the end of these 15 hours you will be well on your way to a career in web design, or just building your own personal website. These are highly valuable skills that you can use for the rest of your life. So why wait? Get started on your next learning journey today.

Webstarts Complete online store Webstarts not only lets you add up to 10 products, but you can also accept credit card payments through Stripe, WePay or Authorize.net. Inventory management is included and there’s even an option to sell digital goods. The only downside is that you are limited to 20 sales per day. But hey, then you should really think about a paid upgrade.
Ah, now it makes sense. Totally understand how that doesn't fit now. I also like how you phrased "mental bandwidth". That definitely seems to be the case with most businesses that I work with, especially startups. The other thing you mentioned that I really like is "typical" businesses. I think that all too often when people think businesses corporate America comes to mind. Most businesses are normal people running shops and trying to stay afloat in a digital sea. So, I wrote something on a similar topic, and I don't want to spam you with a link or anything like that. I was actually looking for feedback on it. If you're interested at all, shoot me an email. GREAT job on this site. It's obvious that you all dropped a lot of time and effort into your site and articles. Bravo!
An extremely useful learning site that covers all manner of subject, and the computer programming section of Khan Academy in particular cannot be overlooked.  It features a variety of self-guided tutorials, generally with experts providing audio and/or video guidance on the topic while interactive on-screen windows show the code and output the results during narration.
Top tip: Don’t just test your website yourself. You will be blind to some of its faults. Plus, you know how your site is supposed to work, so while you might find navigating it easy that’s not to say a stranger will. Get a fresh perspective. Ask family members and friends to test your site and give feedback. If they’re anything like our family and friends they won’t be afraid of offering criticism.
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