Hey Grant, Glad you're finding our discussions helpful! GoDaddy is a pretty good website builder and we've discussed it in more details here. In general, while using website builders with hosts does give you access to a broader range of services, at times, their support teams may not be the best in terms of answering very specific website builder related questions. For instance, Weebly offers really good website building services, and you can reach them by going to Weebly.com. You can also use Weebly through hosts such as Bluehost. Both will work and enable you to build your website, but when it comes to support, if you are using Weebly through Weebly.com directly, you get Weebly's direct customer / technical support team. If you reach out for help through Bluehost, you get Bluehost's support team. We have a much deeper discussion about this specific scenario here. While some of the website builders don't provide you with email accounts, you can also easily sign up for Google Business App's email services for a few dollars a month. This way, you can take advantage of having your own custom domain email addresses, a familiar Gmail interface, and also that your email is stored on Google's servers which is probably a lot safer / reliable / accessible. - Jeremy
One of the most professional and up-to-date online magazines directly aimed at web developers and designers, A List Apart is home to a multitude of exceptional articles dealing with everything from coding and techniques to design and user experience.  If you want to do some light reading and learn from the experience and advice of other experts in the field, browsing through the articles here is a great resource.
In its HTML/CSS course, you’ll be taught the essentials and play with cool effects and customize the headers, footers, images and font styles to make customized web pages. The course also teaches you to make an interactive and responsive website using advanced CSS selectors and special layout techniques. Oh, and also, you’ll be introduced to PHP to make dynamic websites like Facebook.
Others here have stated this, but I'll add some further insights from what I've learned over the past decade or so of learning to build websites on my own: Website Builders like Weebly, Wix, SquareSpace, etc are the easiest for newbies to build something relatively basic without any real web skills needed. The downside is that you don't really own your website, and must pay the monthly fees charged by these platform providers to keep your site up. Also, particularly with Wix, the SEO...
Usually, we’re big advocates of hosted site builders that run in your web browser. But we do of course acknowledge that some of you are more comfortable with an installable Windows or Mac website software. Mobirise is such a program: you install it on your computer and within minutes you’ll be able to start dragging and dropping a free website together – even when you’re offline.
To save time, when hiring a custom web designer, you'll want to create an outline of your website in software you're familiar with like Microsoft Word. Additionally, writing all the page copy and gathering all your images before you contact a developer is also a good idea (the page you're reading now took more than five hours to write). Check out your competitor's websites for some ideas on how your site should function. The more precisely you outline your website needs to the developer the more hours (and money) you'll save.

This is a massive plus of website builders compared to web developers. A web developer can cost between $300 and $1,000 for template customization alone, and a fully customized website built from scratch will often amount to thousands. Making your own website using a builder, meanwhile, allows you to get a fully functioning website up and running for less than the price of a coffee. website building classes
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