2017-11-22 Daniel Glazman of Disruptive Innovations released version 3.01 of BlueGriffon, a WYSIWYG Web editor with support for HTML, MathML, SVG and CSS (full level 2 and parts of level 3). Paying versions add additional functions, such as EPUB creation, predefined templates, HTTP PUT support, visual CSS editor, MathML editor, project manager and responsive design mode. (Linux, Windows, Mac; Open Source)
In addition, we valued those website creators that gave us full rein to customize our site. A small sample of proprietary themes and templates is nice, but we took note of the services that allowed us to import our own theme and edit the HTML for more in-depth customization. We awarded additional points to software that allowed us to edit or create custom HTML and CSS code as well as the programs that allowed us to import our own templates or gave us complete creative control over existing templates.

After purchase, you will receive from us a very important message by email so please make sure your antispam allows emails from noreply@sendowl.com before purchase. The message contains a download link to the User's Manual, a Transaction ID and a License Key. You will need both the Transaction ID and the License Key to activate your license of BlueGriffon® through the Preferences panel of the application. Please make sure to backup the message you received from us!


HTML is a structured markup language. There are certain rules on how HTML must be written if it is to conform to W3C standards for the World Wide Web. Following these rules means that web sites are accessible on all types and makes of computer, to able-bodied and people with disabilities, and also on wireless devices like mobile phones and PDAs, with their limited bandwidths and screen sizes. However, most HTML documents on the web do not meet the requirements of W3C standards. In a study conducted in 2011 on the 350 most popular web sites (selected by the Alexa index), 94 percent of websites fail the web standards markup and style sheet validation tests, or apply character encoding improperly.[4] Even those syntactically correct documents may be inefficient due to an unnecessary use of repetition, or based upon rules that have been deprecated for some years. Current W3C recommendations on the use of CSS with HTML were first formalised by W3C in 1996[5] and have been revised and refined since then. See CSS, XHTML, W3C's current CSS recommendation and W3C's current HTML recommendation. learn to build websites
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